2014 garden and wetland view.jpg
Alyssa2.jpg
20JUN12019.jpg
Birds on a feeder.jpg
2014 garden and wetland view.jpg

Jacoby Creek School Garden


SCROLL DOWN

Jacoby Creek School Garden


 

About Us

Ground was broken in Spring of 2009 to develop this 10,000 square feet site in Bayside, Northern California. Since then, children attending Jacoby Creek School have weeded, planted, harvested and enjoyed fresh produce. We've added nest boxes for birds, homes for solitary bees, and created a dedicated native plant garden to support and increase native species for a richer ecology. Each year new features are added, especially as we deal with the effects of winds from the Bay coupled with higher summer temperatures. 2016 is our first year participating in Project FeederWatch, so that children can learn about local and migratory birds as Citizen Scientists. 

 
Alyssa2.jpg

Garden Club


Garden Club


Garden Club meets after school from September until mid-November, and April until mid- June, two days a week. The children who participate range from TK  - 8th grade. It is their energy that moves horse manure to the planter boxes and beds, ensures that beds are weeded and seeds are sown. A favorite activity is to move straw bales into place so that our tender starts and annual outdoor tomatoes thrive. Most importantly, the children harvest and eat the peas, beans, lemon cucumbers, apples and raspberries they grow. For seven years, children and the garden have grown together. Garden Club offers children the opportunity to actively create a thriving garden, learn about the myriad tasks required to maintain it, and take on more responsibility as they age. Their laughter, delight in being outdoors, and unlimited curiosity bring the garden to life. Thank you to every one  who has nurtured this garden

Garden Club Slideshow

20JUN12019.jpg

Garden Work Days


Weather permitting, the next Work Day is Sunday, May 7th: Noon - 4pm.

Garden Work Days


Weather permitting, the next Work Day is Sunday, May 7th: Noon - 4pm.

Garden Work Days


Garden Work Days


The majority of the garden maintenance and growth is now accomplished through Garden Club, First Grade classroom time (thank you Ms. Hatchett and Ms. McDowall), and the Wednesday 'Summer Activity Center' group led by Colleen (with our appreciation) and her staff. However, some of the tasks are unsuitable for K- 8 students, and during the winter it is too wet for regular groups. Therefore garden work days provide the opportunity for families and community members to share in the success of the garden, as they provide much needed labor.

In the next two months we will schedule a work day every other Sunday, weather permitting. If you have an hour or more to share, and would like to be help out with weeding, soil preparation, repairing damaged planter boxes, and post storms clean up (it's been a tough winter), please wear sturdy waterproof boots and join us. If you enjoy birds, bring your binoculars and a spotting scope, because the wetland pond is teeming with many species of birds. 

Birds on a feeder.jpg

Project FeederWatch


Project FeederWatch


Project FeederWatch is a long term Citizen Science bird counting and observation program led by Cornell University. This is our first year as participants, and it's been very exciting to learn how many birds live in and around the school garden. All of our data is entered online into a database that generates graphs to display our bird observation results. At Godwit Days 2017, our results will be a component of the JCS Garden exhibit on April 21st - 23rd. More information is available at www.godwitdays.org. Braden O'Brien and Camden Narwold are our student scientists this year. They will be presenting their accounts of our pilot project at Godwit Days. 

A week ago, two expert birders led our obervations in the garden, as well as identifying and recording birds in the adjacent fields, and the wetland pond. Rob Fowler posted the results at ebird.org. It was the fourth occasion in the past month that I've seen a bald eagle near the garden, so keep your eyes open. 

 

 

 

Citizen Science


Citizen Science


Can you identify these bees? I would love to know what they are. 

Can you identify these bees? I would love to know what they are. 

About Citizen Science

Put simply, Citizen Science occurs when non-scientists participate in science projects. Counting birds on a feeder is an example of how a person who enjoys watching birds, and learns how to identify them, can provide valuable scientific data for short term and long term research. Improvements in technology have resulted in Citizen Scientists' observations being reported more rapidly, and often accompanied by digital images. Project FeederWatch organizes outr data into graphs. 

Our school garden is now a  participating site in the Million Pollinators Challenge: http://millionpollinatorgardens.org. We will be more closely identifying the plants in the garden, and observing how the bees, butterflies and birdsinteract with the plants. Making notes of our observations, and taking photographs will contribute to the national database. 

Information about how you can receive a packet of seeds to start your own Million Pollinator Challenge Garden will be included in the upcoming Spring, 2017 JCS Garden newsletter.